A Turkish skipper rescue stranded refugees in the Mediterranean.

Refugees and migrants are rescued by members of a Spanish NGO, off the coast of Libya, Nov. 11, 2020. (AP PHOTO)

Ümit Gürpnar, the Turkish captain of a Marshall Islands-flagged cargo ship, rescued 97 illegal migrants over the weekend when their dinghy began taking on water off the coast of Malta. Gürpnar’s ship was travelling near Malta on Saturday when the country’s officials notified him that their ship was the closest to the dinghy containing Libyan, Syrian, Bangladeshi, and Pakistani refugees. Gürpnar and his crew were forced to host the migrants when Malta and Tunisia, the other nearest nations to the site, refused to accept them. After about 12 hours of negotiations, Malta reluctantly admitted the migrants, Demirören News Agency (DHA) reported Monday.

 

Migrants saved by the Turkish captain rest aboard the vessel, off the coast of Malta, June 12, 2021. (DHA PHOTO)
Migrants saved by the Turkish captain rest aboard the vessel, off the coast of Malta, June 12, 2021. (DHA PHOTO)

The 90-meter-long (295-foot-long) vessel was traveling between two Tunisian ports when Maltese authorities sought help to save the migrants. Gürpınar changed the course of his ship and helped the migrants, including children, board his vessel. When he tried to drop them at a Maltese port, Malta refused and asked him to take them to Tunisia. Tunisia also rejected them, while the migrants threatened “mutiny” if they were taken to Tunisia. Turkey’s Foreign Ministry intervened in the situation and after lengthy talks with Malta, convinced the country to take in the migrants.

The Mediterranean’s perilous waters do little to daunt illegal immigrants fleeing conflicts and poverty in their home countries. They often board small dinghies to reach European countries from North Africa and other places littoral to the Mediterranean. This year alone, 784 migrants have died or went missing en route, according to the United Nations figures. Rescue ships operated by charities occasionally patrol the sea to save migrants in trouble. Italy and Malta occasionally refuse migrants arriving en masse, while the European Union has been criticized for failing to come up with a united, humanitarian response to the situation.

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